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Stripping lacquer  

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frankielemmons
(@frankielemmons)
Prominent Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 150
03/02/2021 8:12 pm  

Hello all - I am currently trying to rehab a lone Series 7 chair -  a very low risk project. When I found it it had a very bad blue paint job over the original white lacquer. I've stripped the paint quite easily, but the lacquer is bulletproof. I've tried lacquer thinner with denatured alcohol, and acetone and, besides giving it a very good clean, nothing seems to want to remove the lacquer. 

Does anyone have any experience doing this? Or, does anyone know of what exactly Fritz Hansen's "lacquer" finish is comprised? My current guess is kevlar.

Thanks!


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tktoo2
(@tktoo2)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 425
04/02/2021 1:50 am  

@frankielemmons, Possibly a catalyzed 2-part finish which are nearly indestructible.  I'm not sure if paint strippers containing methylene chloride are still available in the EU, but it's always been my "nuclear option" in the past. If that stuff doesn't work, I don't know what will.


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frankielemmons
(@frankielemmons)
Prominent Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 150
04/02/2021 9:53 pm  

@tktoo2 I think it is pretty hard to find methylene chloride strippers in the US these days. I may just call it and try to do a better job than the last owners with some new paint or enamel. Thanks though!


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tktoo2
(@tktoo2)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 425
04/02/2021 11:18 pm  

@frankielemmons, For some reason I assumed you are in the EU but, yes, methylene chloride was prohibited for consumer use by the EPA in 2019 because, well, it's deadly if improperly used. I have two almost full gallons of pre-ban Strypeeze out in my workshop that I guess I'll try to save for any future "problem" paint removal projects. There are new alternative formulas that tout themselves as 'just as effective' but we all know that cannot be true.

 As a consolation, if your chair has factory paint, chances are the face veneers aren't the best anyway.


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mark737
(@mark737)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 2023 years ago
Posts: 528
12/02/2021 3:20 am  

@frankielemmons How did you apply the acetone?  I recently stripped a coffee table with a tinted lacquer finish.  At first I just brushed on some acetone but it kept drying too quickly to have an effect.  Then I went back and read @spanky 's advice to me from two years ago about using paper towels to keep the acetone wet long enough to dissolve the finish.  So I tried brushing on acetone, then putting a paper towel over it and then brushing more acetone on the towel a couple of times to keep it wet.  Then after a minute or so, wiping off the finish with the wet paper towel.  Went through a whole roll but it worked great.  Here's a link to Spanky's advice.  Thanks again, Spanky!

https://designaddict.com/community/repair/refinishing-advice-on-baughman-desk-and-cherner-chairs/#post-11565


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frankielemmons
(@frankielemmons)
Prominent Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 150
12/02/2021 7:50 pm  

@mark737 I tried this technique too, thinking that it might take some time for any of these solvents to soften the finish. I think that when Fritz Hansen calls this lacquer, they aren't using that term very specifically. This is something far more bulletproof that regular lacquer.


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harry
(@harry)
Active Member
Joined: 2023 years ago
Posts: 7
12/02/2021 9:09 pm  

I used steel wool and 'lacquer thinner' to renew 1930's lacquer.  It doesn't strip it but it does remove oxidized layers so that with another coat of fresh lacquer it is like a minimalist conservation repair.  The principle solvents are toluene, methyl alcohol, methyl ethyl ketone.  An outdoors activity for most folks.


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Mel
 Mel
(@swellmel)
Active Member
Joined: 2023 years ago
Posts: 7
05/04/2021 11:31 am  

Paint on dichloromethane (I use Paramose) liberally and leave for 24 hours. repeat for one or two days. Should start to bubble.  Then put on a fresh coat and while its still wet scrape off as much as you can with a scraper. Then another liberal coat, wait 30 mins , wet it again with stripper, and then go at it with extra course steel wool. You'll get it all off no problem. Use gloves and proper mask with correct filters especially if doing it often as dichlo is toxic . It's only sold to trade so... 


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andrewflintoff
(@andrewflintoff)
Eminent Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 28
09/04/2021 12:03 pm  

Shellac and polish are liquor based completions, which can be taken out with an assortment of solvents that are accessible from your local home improvement shop. Shellac can be taken out with denatured liquor. In the event that liquor doesn't work, attempt finish more slender.


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