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Staining over Teak Oil  

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RentASwag
(@rentaswag)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 5
15/08/2020 9:00 am  

Hello All,

I've been tirelessly trying to strip, sand, and finish a Dux chair that is walnut stained beech. Ultimately, I've concluded i cannot remove a lot of the stain throughout the chair. I was far too afraid to sand deeper than i already had. 

Now, what im left with is a dirty or grimey look throughout the chair. Ive realized this after i applied my first coat of teak oil. Am i able to properly stain the chair over the oil after it dries and apply another coat of oil after? Or should i strip the teak oil, apply a stain, and then finish? 

I initially wanted a light color chair, but if that can no longer be achieved, im fine with it. Ultimately, i would like a chair more uniform in color. Thanks in advance.


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tktoo2
(@tktoo2)
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Joined: 4 years ago
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17/08/2020 4:48 pm  

Can't really advise without seeing in-progress photos but, typically, applying stain over an oil (or any) finish is not recommended.


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RentASwag
(@rentaswag)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 5
18/08/2020 7:04 am  

Thanks @tktoo2

Ive attached a photo. Ive only put one coat of teak oil several days ago. This thing is 30 different colors.

What do you think of toner lacquer? 

 

1597727055-24a06a5e-7533-4db0-a681-18f2d4346d0f.jpeg

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tktoo2
(@tktoo2)
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18/08/2020 2:46 pm  

@rentaswag said, "This thing is 30 different colors." Sorry, but I had to laugh at that one and I might add, "...and none of them particularly attractive!"

A toned lacquer is probably what was on the chair originally and whatever combination of dyes and/or pigments used as toner has penetrated the grain of the beech and is, for our purposes, permanent. Your options all begin with a complete stripping, I'm afraid, followed by staining (or dyeing) with something dark enough to mask the splotches. Typical wood dyes and stains are meant to be semi-transparent, so completely disguising the splotches may ultimately prove impossible.

How would seeing it in satin black seem? Your chair might be a good candidate for 'ebonizing' with India ink. Our dear @spanky has posted photos of problem chairs that she's done using this technique and they look pretty great.

 


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Spanky
(@spanky)
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18/08/2020 3:32 pm  

test


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Spanky
(@spanky)
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18/08/2020 3:33 pm  

weird---I wrote a reply and attached a photo file that was within the size limit, but it wouldn't post. 

So I posted a test message and now I can't edit it. 


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Spanky
(@spanky)
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18/08/2020 3:35 pm  

You rang?

I had the same situation with a Kofod-Larsen lounge chair and ottoman.  The walnut-tinted lacquer was in good shape on 3/4 of it but one entire side had sat near a sunny window for many years and had developed a hideous greenish undertone.  I'd already had experience with removing tinted lacquer on other beech pieces and knew that it would take a LOT of sanding to get the color down to natural beech.

So I ebonized it with permanent India ink.  This is very easy to do once you have every speck of lacquer off.  The ink will only adhere to bare wood.  I'm pretty sure an oil finish would have to be removed first, which i think you can do with denatured alcohol.  The other way to go about it is to have someone refinish it with black lacquer, or do it yourself if you have a dust-free room and some experience in lacquering.  I think this would be a glossy finish, though.  

I think ebonized Danish chairs are stunning.  This is the Kofod-Larsen chair that I did.  I put a paste wax finish over the ink to give it a low sheen.  


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Spanky
(@spanky)
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18/08/2020 3:52 pm  

The file attaching function isn't working for me but this link will work. I hope. 

 

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lexi
 lexi
(@lexi)
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Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 1186
18/08/2020 4:11 pm  

@spanky. I was having trouble posting and editing too: and still do on Chrome. !! So I changed browser and no problems now.

Knowledge shared is Knowledge gained


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Spanky
(@spanky)
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18/08/2020 4:21 pm  

thanks, that must be it.  I use Chrome.


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tktoo2
(@tktoo2)
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18/08/2020 4:27 pm  

Using Firefox and a Mac here. Site is full of annoying new bugs that appeared sometime over the past two weeks.

@spanky, gloss lacquer can be easily 'rubbed out' to satin sheen with #0000 steel wool once completely dry (generally after 4-8hrs). An application of paste wax can help even it out and help to prevent smudges and fingerprints, too, if desired.


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Spanky
(@spanky)
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18/08/2020 4:32 pm  

I've tried rubbing the gloss out but I always end up with shiny bits where the abrasive doesn't reach!  Maybe i'm overly nit-picky, though.  No, I know I'm overly nit-picky.  I get bogged down with the tiniest details all the time. 


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tktoo2
(@tktoo2)
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18/08/2020 5:13 pm  

@spanky, and it doesn't help that chairs seem to present an infinite number of hard-to-reach corners. Enough to test the limits of one's OCD, anyway...

FTR, my anal-retentive tendencies manifest themselves in all sorts of unexpected ways. Lately, it's the kitchen and bathrooms for me. My workshop, OTOH, how the hell could anyone even do 'work' in there??


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RentASwag
(@rentaswag)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 5
19/08/2020 1:46 am  

This has been great. Thanks at ton @tktoo2 and @spanky

Im going to sit on this (not the chair) and think about what to ultimately do. I initially wanted a the chair as light as possible but the ebonized chair looks stunning.

Would mineral spirits / 0000 remove the teak oil as well? Or should i go with the denatured alcohol?

The chair was insanely dry when i stripped it. It still looks a bit thirsty. If i try a stain on it, would the stain be sufficient enough to satisfy the dry wood?

Thanks again.


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Spanky
(@spanky)
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Posts: 4367
19/08/2020 3:11 am  

I don't use mineral spirits much, partly because I just can't tolerate the smell at all. I think other people use it to remove oil finishes. I use alcohol or acetone because they are fast-acting.  

I don't know how much the dryness of the wood matters when doing an ink finish.  I've never put in on a very dry piece.  I think the main concern for putting extra coats of oil on, say, very dry teak is that it will take numerous coats to restore the color and luster that is characteristic of the wood itself.  That's not a concern with an ink finish.  

It's also not a good idea to paint dry wood because the wood absorbs certain ingredients(??) in the paint which weakens the bond...or something like that.  Not that you would paint your chair, just another way that dried out wood isn't great.

I had a beech chair that was badly weathered, very gray with some small splits here and there where the wood was black.  I sanded the HECK out of it, then bleached it, sanded some more---and finally gave up.  I had wanted to do a soap finish---really gorgeous on light colored woods like beech or oak---but even with all the effort to get the grayin out, it still looked awful on the parts where i tested the soap finish.  So i inked it and it's beautiful, just in a different way. 


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